The Power Behind PreWOD™

To say the use of pre-workouts are big prevalent in the gym and fitness culture is an understatement. With so many formulas to choose from, how do you make a wise decision in which is best for you? Pre-workouts are designed in many different ways, from high stimulant content to stimulant-free. Most pre-workouts are multi-ingredient supplements with the aim to increase performance in the gym. The truth is though, not all pre-workouts are created equal, nor do they all have the consumer’s best interest in mind.

Some pre-workouts like to hide behind proprietary blends. When this happens you don’t know how much of what ingredient you are getting. Others will list out their “1800mg Performance Blend” or “3500mg Energy Matrix Blend”. These blends might feature caffeine, taurine, beta-alanine, creatine, and other performance-enhancing ingredients. How much of those ingredients are actually in the product?

That’s why at Driven Nutrition® we offer upfront no proprietary blends in any of our products. Amounts of each ingredient are listed so you know exactly what you are putting in your body and you know that you are getting the efficacious dose.

Driven Nutrition® PreWOD™ is scientifically formulated to boost endurance, create massive energy and maximize blood flow while protecting your body from the effects of peak-intensity aerobic and anaerobic exercise during your workout of the day.

What exactly in PreWOD™ makes it an effective pre-workout? Let’s dive into the science behind some of these ingredients.

Paige Henry Rowing

Caffeine Anhydrous

Caffeine is a powerful stimulant, and it can be used to improve physical strength and endurance. It is classified as a nootropic because it sensitizes neurons and provides mental stimulation. Studies show that a dose of caffeine will improve strength and endurance performance by reducing the user’s perception of pain. Caffeine also plays a role in calcium mobilization for stronger muscular contractions, which can increase power output.

Further caffeine spares muscle glycogen stores, primarily due to increased fat burning, enhancing its endurance and performance properties.

Beta-alanine

Beta-alanine has been shown to enhance muscular endurance. Beta-alanine supplementation can also improve moderate- to high-intensity cardiovascular exercise performance, like rowing or sprinting. When beta-alanine is ingested, it turns into the molecule carnosine, which acts as an acid buffer in the body. Carnosine stores in cells and released in response to drops in pH. Increased stores of carnosine can protect against exercise-induced lactic acid production.

Citrulline Malate

Citrulline is an amino acid known for its ability to increase nitric oxide (NO) levels. NO induces vasodilation, the enlargement of blood vessels. Citrulline converts to Arginine in the kidneys and stimulates the release of NO. By expanding the blood vessels, this leads to decreases in lactic acid buildup by removing waste and increasing nutrient and oxygen transport to muscles.

Citrulline has been found to increase muscular ATP efficiency due to nitric oxide. Studies show that in humans, supplementation with 6g of CM a day for 15 days led to a significant reduction in the sensation of fatigue. A 34% increase in the rate of oxidative ATP production during exercise, increasing performance in longer bouts of exercise.

Huperzine A & DMAE

Huperzine-A is known as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, which means that it stops an enzyme from breaking down acetylcholine which results in increases in acetylcholine. Acetylcholine plays a role in muscle contraction and plays an important role in cognitive function.

DMAE is a compound known as a mind health compound. DMAE is a compound that many people believe can positively affect mood, enhance memory, and improve brain function.

This makes the powerful combination of Huperzine-A and DMAE the perfect additions to bring enhanced mental focus to your workouts.

Go harder, go longer, and get better results from every rep with PreWOD™!

Mix one scoop with 4-6 ounces of water and shake. To assess tolerance, begin by taking ½ scoop and increase daily, as tolerated, up to one full scoop.

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References

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  • Derave W, Ozdemir MS, Harris RC, et al. beta-Alanine supplementation augments muscle carnosine content and attenuates fatigue during repeated isokinetic contraction bouts in trained sprinters. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2007;103(5):1736–1743. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00397.2007
  • Kern, B., Robinson, T. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on performance and body composition in collegiate wrestlers and football players. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 6, P2 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-6-S1-P2
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